This is a question we are frequently asked: How many hours of language training does it take to go from one level to the next? This makes sense to the learner who wants to identify the purpose of their training and how long it will take for the trainee to reach their goal.

After 13 years of existence and experience** (Lingueo was created in 2007), we have analyzed the data of our thousands of clients and can now give you a realistic forecast of your progress in the language of your choice.

You have probably already heard of the CEFR level used for language training. This model is very similar to a staircase: the distance between each step and each level is the same, and at each step a level is reached on the CEFR scale. The distance to go from level one to level two is the same as the distance to go from level two to level three, as illustrated in the visual below:

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However, this image is incorrect because learning a language is more like "climbing a mountain" than climbing a staircase: the closer you get to the top of the mountain, the more difficult it is. And the higher the level, the more time is invested and the wider the range of skills to acquire. So the illustration below corresponds more globally to reality.

CECRL close to reality" class="csh-markdown csh-markdown-image">CEFR](<a href=https://storage.crisp.chat/users/helpdesk/website/82693408a9e29800/niveaux_1rnzjjb.png)

However, this image is incorrect because learning a language is more like &quot;climbing a mountain&quot; than climbing a staircase: the closer you get to the top of the mountain, the more difficult it is. And the higher the level, the more time is invested and the wider the range of skills to acquire. So the illustration below corresponds more globally to reality.

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It remains to be seen how many hours of language training are needed to move from one level to the next? Knowing that each person who undergoes training develops their language skills at a different pace and in a different way. In addition, there are many factors that determine the speed at which a language level increases, such as:

Age and motivation
The target language
The background of the person being trained (education, other language skills, etc.)
Exposure to the target language outside of formal learning
Individual or self-study
Type of training (individual or group?) Large group versus small group? Face-to-face or distance learning?

To answer this question precisely, we based our analysis on a sample of over 10,000 learners over a 10-year period.

For English, Spanish, Italian...

...German, French (FLE), Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese from Portugal. It is necessary to complete on average 50 hours of videoconference courses to reach a higher level.

Level by level details:



Table help: If you start with an A1: Basic User (introductory or discovery level), 45 hours of video conference instruction will be needed to reach the A2: Basic User (intermediate or common level).

For Chinese, Japanese, Russian...

...Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Hebrew, Arabic and Hindi

10 to 20 hours of additional classes are needed to learn rare languages
Why: new alphabet / new accents / new word diction / different cultures



Regarding sign language:

10 hours to 20 hours less instruction is needed in learning French Sign Language
Why: no oral diction needed to learn / no cultural barrier / sign language related to French vocabulary already known****



Self-study is the extra time you spend between private lessons. It has a strong impact on the number of hours spent with your teacher called exposure time. The importance of exposure increases as your language level increases. Contact with native speakers also becomes more and more important.

Lingueo offers free self-study exercises in the following languages: ....
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